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wapiti3:

The natural history of the cranes. ; By Blyth, Edward, 1810-1873 Tegetmeier, W. B. (William Bernhard), 1816-1912 on Flickr.

Publication info [London]Pub. for the author by H. Cox [etc.]1881.
Contributing Library:
Cornell University Library
BioDiv. Library

(via scientificillustration)

Source: wapiti3
Photo Set

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

piranhapunk:

thehansoloist:

These photos were taken a few seconds apart.

ahhh how majestic

We are so lucky to have Weird Al in the world :D

Source: thehansoloist
Photo Set

illuminescentart:

Godzilla in Chicago: Cloud Gate (+ Godzilla Selfie)

IT’S A SPACE BEAN! So I took a side trip to Chicago after my Cali adventures! I’ll post some pics I took as the week goes on. :]

Cheers!

Lume

Source: illuminescentart
Link

http://thefingerfuckingfemalefury.tumblr.com/post/93210639178/themetaisawesome-thefingerfuckingfemalefury

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

themetaisawesome:

rosescarletfairy:

themetaisawesome:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

home-of-a-heart:

thtwhitegurrl:

slutdust:

I bought my friend an elephant for their room.

They said “Thank you.”

I said “Don’t mention it.”

Is there a joke here that 15 thousand people get but I don’t?

I DONT GET IT…

It’s okay we all have jokes fly over our heads sometimes. Happens to me all the time.

*Meta hug*

<3 GROUP CUDDLE <3 

Source: slutdust
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cantsman:

tharook:

alias-milamber:

A real thing you can buy

What a time to be alive.

Why is cartoon me advertising this?

(via angryinternetvagina)

Source: alias-milamber
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tomscholes:

As exercise, I’ll be sharing a drop of my inspiration folder each day for a month. The theme will remain unspoken and will be relaxed yet connected. Let me know what you think and if you’d like to suggest a topic :)

Pt. 1 2 3

Source: tomscholes
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lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day

Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.

Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.

The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.

Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(via scientificillustration)

Source: lhldigital.lindahall.org